RADIOACTIVE HIPSTER

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The most expensive city in the world… Especially if you shop at Stussy

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Ok, so I realize that I often bitch about how much more things cost in Japan than the US. I’m just trying to understand why the difference is so ridiculously huge. I completely get that things from overseas cost more and that there are taxes and tariffs in place to help Japanese companies compete. But when it comes to apparel, the numbers are so out of whack that it drives me crazy. Case in point:

https://www.stussy.jp/shop/lineup/detail/10160

Stussy is an American company and I expect it to cost a bit more in Japan. This button-up shirt is ¥17,640. Stussy is a skate/urban/streetwear company, and that equates $182.84. That is up there in “high-end” territory with the likes of Burberry — and it seems that Japanese believe Stussy to be somehow “exclusive” when you can pick up a World Tour T shirt for $19 at Zumiez.

The same exact shirt, direct from Stussy in the US:

http://www.stussy.com/us/2-tone-shirt

$88.00! The Japanese version is more than DOUBLE the price, nearly $100 more… for the SAME exact item.

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Thankfully, I have a cool family in America that I can ship to, who then ships it to me (as a present to avoid import taxes). But I’m honestly struggling with patronizing a brand that allows this to happen.

How can Stussy survive (and if you look around places like Harajuku, clearly thrive) when they are unabashedly pillaging Japanese customers’ wallets?! Who decides the unbelievable markup and how do they get away with it? I can’t even begin to imagine the profit margins…

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池袋: The pond bag

Sayonara, Kabukicho. I’ve just moved to a new apartment in Ikebukuro, home of several of Japan’s largest department store, the second busiest train station, and (allegedly) rampant nampa (picking up girls off the street) and “gyaku nampa” (girls picking guys up off the street). I’ve also become the proud parent of a new MacBook Air, so hopefully posts will pick back up again soon. よろしくお願いします.

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I’ve ramped up the Japanese study and decided to update my stationery. A friend recommended the “Kuru Toga” mechanical pencil — with an “engine” designed by Mitsubishi that turns the lead while you write to keep it sharp. Japanese stationery is a lot like Japanese electronics: always ahead of the curve. About ¥500 at Tokyu Hands.

I’ve ramped up the Japanese study and decided to update my stationery. A friend recommended the “Kuru Toga” mechanical pencil — with an “engine” designed by Mitsubishi that turns the lead while you write to keep it sharp. Japanese stationery is a lot like Japanese electronics: always ahead of the curve. About ¥500 at Tokyu Hands.

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I’m feeling this new billboard in Omotesando for the Prada LG phone — clean and simple. Plus, I’ve always been a huge Edward Norton fan.

I’m feeling this new billboard in Omotesando for the Prada LG phone — clean and simple. Plus, I’ve always been a huge Edward Norton fan.

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"BiKing" campaign to begin October 31st.
No, the King isn’t bi-curious. バイキング (pronounced “Baikingu”) is the Katakana-ization of “Viking,” the word that Japanese use for all-you-can-eat or buffet-style dining.
From Halloween until November 15th, ordering a Whopper set (burger, drink, and fries or rings) will enable you to order as many additional Whoppers as you can stomach in 30 minutes at no additional cost.
Interesting side note: You can order a Heineken instead of a soda at BK Japan.

"BiKing" campaign to begin October 31st.

No, the King isn’t bi-curious. バイキング (pronounced “Baikingu”) is the Katakana-ization of “Viking,” the word that Japanese use for all-you-can-eat or buffet-style dining.

From Halloween until November 15th, ordering a Whopper set (burger, drink, and fries or rings) will enable you to order as many additional Whoppers as you can stomach in 30 minutes at no additional cost.

Interesting side note: You can order a Heineken instead of a soda at BK Japan.

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